Thinkubator Media Launches New Online Comms Course

Hooray! Join us in celebrating the official launch of our Communications Foundations course! Thinkubator Media founder and CEO, Lori Lennon, has launched an exciting 101 course for communicating your company or research.

At Thinkubator Media, we understand that the world of communication can be daunting when juggling STEM work's intricacies. Our communications course offers STEM students and professionals a chance to learn the basics of building a successful communications foundations for your work. Together, we will learn the terms and lay the groundwork for creating your ideal communications strategy.

Learning how to share your work effectively helps you identify and target your ideal audience, develop a strong brand, and organize your content in realistic and captivating ways. From there, you can share your innovative research, developments, and creations to those who need to hear it.

Our communications course offers the resources and tools needed to start building your communications plan, regardless of budget.

As we dive into these six focal points throughout the course, you and your team will leave with greater confidence in your ability to produce honest and engaging content. Before you know it, you’ll have a captivating brand coming to life right before your eyes, launching you on a steady path toward marketing success.

Enroll in our Communications Foundations program to get started today!

Mbadika: Meet Netia McCray and Her Limitless World of Ideas

Netia McCray grew up watching her parents make their dreams become reality. Her mother and father were scientists in their own right, demonstrating a particular knack for creation and production. 

Netia’s mother was a seamstress, demonstrating design development with her unique fashion creations for family and community members alike. Her mother would also spend her spare time teaching others how to nurture their own entrepreneurial spirits. 

Netia’s father was a mechanical engineer, working on cars and spending much of his time tinkering away at old gadgets and gizmos.

At the end of her junior year in high school, Netia was invited to check out MIT’s summer enrichment program, MITES (Minority Introduction to Engineering and Science). After aspiring to attend the school himself, her father fervently suggested that she attend the program. Unsure of what MIT had to offer, Netia was initially skeptical, assuming she’d be forced to learn nuclear physics. 

Once she reached the Cambridge campus, Netia was pleasantly surprised by MIT’s vast scientific opportunities, unveiling a rich world of potential. Netia was exposed to a unique network of STEM (science, technology, engineering, and math) disciplines, unraveling the mystery of science into something more digestible. Blown away by the fullness of STEM, Netia eagerly participated in the program and earned herself a full ride to the school as an undergraduate, making her family proud. 

Despite facing personal and social hardships, Netia was determined and graduated from MIT with a desire to bring her newfound passion to young students like her. She has been on a mission to demystify the world of science and open the doors of opportunity to more students of color ever since.

Shortly after graduating, Netia launched her company Mbadika, (bah-GEEe-kah), focusing on providing local Boston high school students with paid STEM internships. The internship program not only allowed the students to explore the sciences, but they also had a hand in developing some of the later programming for Mbadika. The first cohort of students contributed to the design and production of the MLAB field kits, which continue to inspire fellow explorers ages 8 and up.  Mbadika also recently launched a public workshop initiative, MLAB, to provide the general public access to STEM education in informal settings such as local shopping centers. Featured in a pop-up at the Cambridgeside Galleria, these biweekly workshops offered students and newcomers a taste of STEM by exploring the science of fashion or how to recreate items from popular films. 

Both the workshop and internship aim to bring various STEM concepts and practices such as design development, 3D Printing, digital content creation, and more. Netia has been able to present complex topics and ideas in a relatable and engaging way. In this way, Netia has successfully been able to empower people from all walks of life to take risks, be bold, and realize their innate ability to understand STEM. 

Jessica Sanon Amplifies the Voice of Women and Girls in STEM

It is a well-known fact that the world as we know it has been dominated by male thought and expression for the last several thousand years. Science and math in particular, have been marketed and managed in a way to filter out young women from diving head-first into these mysterious concepts. 

Jessica Sanon is one of many phenomenal women who have stepped forward to amplify the female voice in STEM (science, technology, engineering, and mathematics). After taking the science and tech world by storm, Jessica is intentionally bringing young BIPOC women with her. 

Her company, sySTEMic Flow, brings impactful opportunities in STEM to young BIPOC girls across the country, inspiring a future generation of diverse and esteemed STEM professionals. sySTEMic flow exposes girls and young women to the exciting world of science and math to develop a firm grasp of STEM concepts. Her intentionality around math and science programming broadens the girls’ understanding of traditionally complex topics and leans into how applicable those topics are to their daily lives. From virtual escape rooms to math jeopardy, sySTEMic flow presents math in new and exciting ways, taking the intimidation out of loving and understanding the subject. As she watches her students draw their own exciting conclusions, each girl develops a lasting sense of confidence.

With over a decade of experience in math and science, Jessica has remained steadfast in her efforts to empower young women. Her commitment to advancing the STEM education of young BIPOC women serves a unique purpose by directly addressing deep-rooted and long-standing socioeconomic issues. Her work helps to empower and inspire individuals to explore a higher potential. STEM holds a world of opportunities for all of us. Jessica is committed to creating open and safe spaces in STEM  for collaboration and empowerment.  By sharing a unique and relatable perspective with communities of women who may have limited access to these resources, Jessica and sySTEMic flow are making a positive shift toward an equitable and unified future. 

Jessica continues to advocate for a brighter future by dedicating her time to advancing progressive action in STEM with diversity and inclusion (DEI) work. Outside of sySTEMic flow, she supports individuals and teams with career coaching and business and program development. Jessica’s DEI work blends well with sySTEMic flow, as it paves the way for more companies to value and hire BIPOC young women as they eagerly enter STEM fields. Jessica has also appeared in several national and local media outlets, including Boston 25 News and a TED Talk

Project Highlight: Mothers In Science

Mothers in Science is a global nonprofit, advocating for the presence and empowerment of mothers in STEMM fields. 

Founded by two French moms back in 2019, this budding organization has rapidly taken off, becoming the world’s largest advocate for moms in science.

The core team consists of inspiring women, who work with mothers in STEMM to create a firm foundation to springboard into a successful and balanced life and career. The team’s online community supports a host of individuals including fathers and parents-to-be, who can offer encouragement and resources to one another. 

The team also conducts thorough research, providing evidence-based solutions to the juggling act that often comes with balancing family and work life. Mothers in Science stands for a holistic, inclusive, and empowering experience for all people in all spaces. The historical discrepancies in women’s representation in science put mothers in STEMM at the forefront of the team’s mission. 

As the team strives to convey the importance of not only including but accommodating women in the workplace, Mothers in Science will continue to break ground for the rest of the workforce as well. When we honor mothers, they are better equipped to honor themselves, making the care and nurturance they share with their families extend into everything they do. 

Learn more about Mothers in Science here

No Limits: Honoring Mae Jemison

Photo Source: Britannica.com (https://www.britannica.com/biography/Mae-Jemison#/media/1/302488/117565)

Women have pioneered alongside their male counterparts since the dawn of time. What a dull world we would have if there were truly only one perspective to shape life as we know it.  

Women have also had a hand in shaping the way we see and understand outer space. Many notable women explorers have traveled among the stars, with one in particular who had to face many challenges to get there. 

Mae Jemison was born in Alabama and raised in Chicago during the 1960s. In a particularly heated social climate, dreams only seemed to go so far for people who looked like Mae. Hearing about other people’s constant fears and doubts never stopped Mae from having her head just above the clouds, where she could stay in touch with her big, bold dreams. 

She received her college education from Stanford University, where she studied chemical engineering at just 16 years old. For a young black woman in the 1970s, such a feat was incredible in itself, proving to Mae that she could truly do anything. 

After completing several community-based health initiatives after graduating college, Mae Jemison applied to NASA twice. In 1987, just 4 years after Sally Ride became the first American woman and third woman to travel to space, Mae was picked out of a pool of 2,000+ applicants to join NASA’s space exploration team. After several years of astronaut training, Mae Jemison took her first trip to space in 1992, making history as the first Black woman in space.

Since completing her historical debut in outer space, Mae Jemison has continued to stay pretty down to earth. She has since taught at several universities such as Dartmouth College and Cornell University. Ms. Jemison also launched a space and science camp for kids, called The Earth We Share, lasting well into the mid-2000s. She also launched a non-profit in honor of her mother, Dorothy Jemison, specializing in science, space, and youth engagement. Currently, Mae advises several companies and organizations to guide scientific improvements as well as DEI initiatives. 

With a long-time love for science and dance, Mae was able to marry her innate talents with her desire for exploration. Her mother was sure to guide her to continue taking her education seriously while making time and space to fulfill her passions as well. 

Mae Jemison is a testament to women and girls everywhere; we don’t have to choose just one passion to pursue to claim our victory in life. The world becomes an even brighter place when we make room for all of the things that inspire and bring us joy.